Story Time – Who Was Your Hero?

Today I’m seeing headlines about some “challenge” posed by a “TV Star” and the dangers young girls are putting themselves in trying to emulate the girl. This famous girl is no one particularly special. She just happens to have been born into a wealthy family who has made their fortunes mostly by parading their “glamorous” life on “reality” television. The father wishes he were a woman, the mother was previously married to a lawyer who defended a former sports-hero who was accused of murdering his ex-wife and her lover. The girl’s sisters have made themselves famous – or infamous – through “reality” TV and other endeavors by which they actually have shown some business acumen.

But why do our kids today want to emulate these types of “stars?” What is so impressive about today’s celebrities that we, as a society, indulge them any credibility as people of interest, let alone role models?

When I was a kid, the only “reality” TV was the local news or perhaps a game show where some “regular” person might win a wash machine. Our “heroes” came from comic books and TV shows that where fiction. Little boys might want to be Superman or Captain America. We little girls wanted to be like Wonder Woman or even the Bionic Woman. We wanted our pretend boyfriends to be one of the Monkees or maybe one of the men from “S.W.A.T.”

I am not a fan of any form of today’s “reality” TV (even “Survivor” has jumped the shark for me), and I have a hard time understanding what attracts others to watch the seemingly endless parade of train wrecks that have replaced entertainment as we used to know it. I am thankful that my husband and I canceled our satellite service years ago every time I pass by the TV in our break room at work and someone is watching a program about “My 600 Pound Life” or “Neighbors with Benefits.” Whoever consents to being on a program about how sex landed them in the emergency room is NOT a celebrity in the making. These people, in my opinion, are either very sad attention whores, or they think they have found an easy way to make some money.

But at what cost?

Well, if you ask me, the cost is their integrity. People of good character aren’t going to put every aspect of their lives under a microscope for the rest of society to judge. Those that do risk extensive ridicule and humiliation. And, those that allow their worlds to be scrutinized by the masses have no right to complain later about their mistreatment.

In the mean time, if you are a parent, are you monitoring what your children are watching on television? What are they reading in magazines or viewing on the internet? Do you think it’s okay for your daughters to want to inject foreign substances into their lips so they are nice and plump like some spoiled brat on TV whose parents clearly do not have their own children’s best interests in mind?

Introduce your kids to some of your local firemen, policemen, or veterans. Let them see what a real hero looks like and encourage them to emulate people of high moral character and integrity. Turn off the TV. Disable the internet. Teach your kids that their self-worth should be based on what they can accomplish without trying to mimic the UN-reality of what they are exposed to in the media.

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